Model Demonstrations

Sample Project Performance Measures 

Please follow the link to see examples of generic project performance measures for model demonstration consistent with the model demonstration priorities.  Grantees will work with their OSEP Project Officers to adapt these measures to meet the unique aspects of their projects and to develop additional measures, as appropriate.

Resources

Selected Literature on Model Demonstration

Planning for Replication and Dissemination from the Start: Guidelines for Model Demonstration Projects

The purpose of this brief is to help model developers turn what may be implicit knowledge about model implementation into explicit information about what the model is, how it works, and what is needed to implement it to achieve the intended results. This brief has two primary sections. The first section outlines the factors that model developers should consider and document as their models are built, implemented, and refined in preparation for replication. The second section presents considerations for developing a dissemination plan for communicating information about a model in ways that reach and are useful to practitioners and others. Tools and additional resources are included in the appendices.

Assessing Sites for Model Demonstration: Lessons Learned from OSEP Grantees

The purpose of this brief is to present lessons learned from the directors of OSEP-funded model demonstration projects on  identifying the conditions, at potential demonstration sites, likely to promote or hinder the implementation of model demonstration projects. The most important indicators of site capacity necessary for successful model demonstration implementation are discussed. Resources for assessing site capacity for model demonstration are included in an appendix.

Preparing for Model Demonstration Implementation

The purpose of this brief is to discuss issues and approaches to preparing for initial implementation of model demonstrations. The goal of this stage is to build the capacity of individual implementers, as well as the organizations or systems in which they work, to support implementation and optimize conditions for success. Much of the implementation literature highlights the importance of preparation in achieving high-quality implementation and ultimately, improved outcomes for the target population. This report summarizes the experiences of leaders of OSEP-funded model demonstration projects during the implementation preparation stage of their projects.

Improving Implementation of Programs and Practices for Children with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from the Model Demonstration Coordination Center

The purpose of this report is to describe lessons learned through 10 years of coordination and collaboration between the Model Demonstration Coordination Center and OSEP-funded model demonstration projects. The report begins with a description of the Model Demonstration Coordination Center, followed by a brief summary of research in implementation science, including conceptual frameworks that have been developed for understanding the implementation process. Next grantees describe experiences at the various stages of implementation, and strategies for assessing sites’ readiness to advance to the next stage are presented. The remainder of the report summarizes specific strategies that future model demonstration grantees and other intervention developers can use to increase the likelihood of high-quality and sustained implementation.

Sustainment of Model Demonstration Projects: Findings from Follow-Up Studies

The purpose of this brief is to share findings from follow-up studies of OSEP-funded model demonstration projects that were conducted, in part, to examine model sustainment. Because a primary objective of most model demonstration projects during their grant period was to examine model feasibility in real-world settings, one justification for the follow-up studies conducted by the Model Demonstration Coordination Center and the projects themselves was to look at factors seen as promoting or hindering model sustainment after the project ended. The final chapter of this brief highlights some conclusions surrounding model sustainment drawn from these follow-up studies.

Translating the Statistical Representation of the Effects of Education Interventions into More Readily Interpretable Forms

The primary purpose of this paper is to provide suggestions to researchers about ways to present statistical findings about the effects of educational interventions that might make the nature and magnitude of those effects easier to understand. These suggestions and the related discussion are framed within the context of studies that use experimental designs to compare measured outcomes for two groups of participants, one in an intervention condition and the other in a control condition.

General Resources for Researchers

The primary purpose for this link is to share an IES repository of resources related to designing studies, implementing programs, and analyzing data

 

Selected Products from Funded Model Demonstration Projects (posted with permission)

Resources developed by English Learner Model Demonstration Projects

Effective Practices for English Learners: Brief 1, Meeting the Needs of English Learners Through a Multitiered Instructional Framework

In this introductory brief, three model demonstration projects describe their work implementing various tiered instructional models focused on language and literacy at schools with high percentages of English learners in kindergarten through grade 3. This brief is the first in a series devoted to effective practices for English learners. 

Effective Practices for English Learners: Brief 2, Assessment and Data-Based Decision-Making

This document is the second in a series of briefs for school leaders, educators, and policymakers charged with implementing or supporting multi tiered instruction that meet the needs of English learners (ELs). In this brief, three model demonstration projects address issues that school and district personnel frequently encounter when designing and implementing tiered instruction in schools that implement bilingual pro­grams or that serve ELs in English as a second language programs.

Effective Practices for English Learners: Brief 3, Core and Supplemental English as a Second Language Literacy Instruction for English Learners

This document is the third in a series of briefs for school leaders, educators, and policymakers charged with implementing or supporting multi tiered instruction that meet the needs of English learners (ELs). In this brief, three model demonstration projects share their framework for the successful design and delivery of core and supplemental literacy instruction for kindergarten to grade 3 ELs who receive literacy instruction in English only. This brief provides guidance to educators in preparing and delivering English instruction for ELs and in fram­ing supports for classroom teachers that ensure culturally and linguistically responsive core and supple­mental English literacy instruction.

Effective Practices for English Learners: Brief 4, Core and Supplemental Biliteracy Instruction for English Learners

This brief is the fourth in a series for school leaders, educators, and policymakers charged with imple­menting or supporting multi tiered instruction that meet the needs of English learners (ELs). This brief summarizes the work of three model demonstration projects that implement research-based practices for the successful delivery of core and supplemental literacy instruction for ELs in urban, near-urban, and rural schools. Brief 4 includes three major sections: (a) an overview of biliteracy and bilingual education, (b) a framework for biliteracy instruction, and (c) examples of the principles of biliteracy instruction in practice in project schools.

Effective Practices for English Learners: Brief 5, Professional Development to Support a Multitiered Instructional Framework

This document is the fifth in a series of briefs for school leaders, educators, and policymakers charged with implementing or supporting multi tiered instruction that meet the needs of English learners (ELs). In this brief, three model demonstration projects share their framework for providing quality, evidence-based professional development (PD) that supports educators’ efforts to understand and meet the needs of ELs. This brief emphasizes the importance of supporting educators within a multi tiered instructional framework.

 

Resources developed by Project ELITE (EL Model Demonstration)

Read-Aloud Routine for Building Vocabulary and Comprehension Skills in Prekindergarten

This flip book presents a routine for teachers to use in their classrooms. There also is a K–3 version of the flip book. Citation:  The Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk. (2014). Read-aloud routine for building vocabulary and comprehension skills in prekindergarten. Austin, TX: Author.

Implementing Structured Data Meetings: A Year-Round Tool for Optimizing Instructional Planning for English Learners

Project ELITE designed professional development and tools for implementing structured data meetings at key assessment points throughout the year (Beginning-, Middle-, and End-of-Year) for all educators serving ELs, as well as monthly for core (Tier I) classroom teachers. Self-paced training modules were also developed and used by educators to increase their understanding of the purpose of structured data meetings in a multi tiered instructional framework.  The trainings include an overview of the purposes, procedures, and materials needed to conduct successful structured data meetings. Citation:  The Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk. (2016). Implementing structured data meetings: A year-round tool for optimizing instructional planning for English learners. Austin, TX: Author.

Teachers’ Read-Aloud Routine for Building Vocabulary and Comprehension Skills

Project ELITE worked with K–3 to implement a new way of reading books aloud to enhance students' vocabulary and comprehension. This flip book presents a routine for teachers to use in their classrooms. Citation:  The Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk. (2014). Read-aloud routine for building vocabulary and comprehension skills. Austin, TX: Author.

Read-Aloud Routine Bookmark for Parents, English and Spanish

Project ELITE worked with K–3 teachers to implement a new way of reading books aloud to enhance students' vocabulary and comprehension. This bookmark presents a routine for parents to use with their children.  Citation:  The Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk. (2013). Read-aloud routine: Rutina de leer en voz alta. Austin, TX: Author.

 

Selected Instrumentation from Funded Model Demonstration Projects (posted with permission)

Class and School Context Instrument. The Adolescent Literacy Model Demonstration projects created an instrument to capture the context features of their implementation sites.  The instrument summarizes demographic and instructional features at the school- and classroom- levels.